スポンサーサイト 

上記の広告は1ヶ月以上更新のないブログに表示されています。
新しい記事を書く事で広告が消せます。
[ --/--/-- --:-- ] スポンサー広告 | トラックバック(-) | コメント(-)

自由と繁栄の弧にビルマも 

 今ビルマは反政府デモで大変な騒ぎになっていますが、ForeignAffairsのサイトのトップページに対ビルマ政策についての提言「Asia's Forgotten Crisis - A New Approach to Burma」が載っていました。筆者二人のうち一人は前米国家安全保障会議上級アジア部長で知日派のマイケル・グリーン。オンライン翻訳にぶっこんでみたところ、なかなか面白そうだったので頑張って訳してみました。ちなみに以前オンライン翻訳でいくつか使い比べてみましたが、一番いいと思うのはエキサイト翻訳ですね。もしもっとおすすめのがあれば教えてください。


Summary: Over the past decade, Burma has gone from being an antidemocratic embarrassment and humanitarian disaster to being a serious threat to its neighbors' security. The international community must change its approach to the country's junta.


①Many Western governments, legislatures, and human rights organizations advocated applying pressure through diplomatic isolation and punitive economic sanctions. Burma's neighbors, on the other hand, adopted a form of constructive engagement in the hope of enticing the SLORC to reform. The result was an uncoordinated array of often contradictory approaches. The United States limited its diplomatic contact with the SLORC and eventually imposed mandatory trade and investment restrictions on the regime. Europe became a vocal advocate for political reform. But most Asian states moved to expand trade, aid, and diplomatic engagement with the junta, most notably by granting Burma full membership in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) in 1997.

A decade later, the verdict is in: neither sanctions nor constructive engagement has worked. If anything, Burma has evolved from being an antidemocratic embarrassment and humanitarian disaster to being a serious threat to the security of its neighbors. But despite the mounting danger, many in the United States and the international community are still mired in the old sanctions-versus-engagement battle.
②Worse, the SPDC appears to have been taking an even more threatening turn recently. Western intelligence officials have suspected for several years that the regime has had an interest in following the model of North Korea and achieving military autarky by developing ballistic missiles and nuclear weapons. Last spring, the junta normalized relations and initiated conventional weapons trade with North Korea in violation of UN sanctions against Pyongyang. And despite Burma's ample reserves of oil and gas, it signed an agreement with Russia to develop what it says will be peaceful nuclear capabilities. For these reasons, despite urgent problems elsewhere in the world, all responsible members of the international community should be concerned about the course Burma is taking.
③ASEAN may be the most important component of any international Burma policy. The organization invited Burma to join it in 1997 partly on the theory that integration would enhance ASEAN's influence over the junta more than would isolation (and partly out of concern over China's growing influence in the country). More recently, however, the ten-member organization has come to recognize that Burma is not only a stain on its international reputation but also a drain on its diplomatic resources and a threat to peace and stability in Asia.
④When ASEAN was created four decades ago, its five founding states undertook not to interfere in each other's internal affairs as a way both to distance themselves from their colonial pasts and to avoid conflict in the future. But last January, ASEAN members prepared a new charter for the twenty-first century that champions democracy promotion and human rights as universal values, and they have established a human rights commission despite the SPDC's strong objections. With ASEAN's underlying principles under revision, leadership by Southeast Asian nations will become an even more essential component of any new international approach to the junta.

Japan will be another important force for reform. Tokyo and Washington perennially disagreed over their policies toward Burma in the 1980s and 1990s, but there has been a promising shift in Japan's attitude recently. Now that Tokyo has to contend with the slowdown in Japan's economic power and the rise in China's, it is articulating its foreign policy objectives and diplomacy in different terms. In November 2006, Japanese Foreign Minister Taro Aso made a speech promoting an "arc of freedom and prosperity" from the Baltics to the Pacific and touting Tokyo's commitment to human rights, democracy, and the rule of law. His speech conspicuously omitted any mention of Burma, but there is no question that Japan's Burma policy has been shifting significantly. In September 2006, Tokyo finally agreed to support a discussion on Burma in the UN Security Council. Members of the Diet have created the Association for the Promotion of Values-Based Diplomacy, which seeks to infuse Japanese foreign policy in Asia with a renewed emphasis on promoting democracy. And last May, former Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi joined 43 other former heads of state in an open letter calling on the SPDC to unconditionally release Suu Kyi.

Securing Japan's cooperation will be especially important. The Burmese people generally have a positive memory of Japan's assistance in helping the country throw off British colonial rule in the 1940s. Both the junta and the democratic opposition see opportunities for Japanese aid to help rebuild the country (although they disagree on the conditions under which that aid would be welcome). Furthermore, Burma presents a unique opportunity for Japan to demonstrate its bona fides on promoting democracy, protecting human rights, and advancing regional security -- especially at a time when the rhetoric and policies of China, the other Asian giant, continue to focus on outdated mercantilist principles.
⑤If ASEAN and Japan are critical components of any international approach to Burma, China and India could be the greatest obstacles to efforts to induce reform in the country. China has many interests in Burma. Over the past 15 years, it has developed deep political and economic relations with Burma, largely through billions of dollars in trade and investment and more than a billion dollars' worth of weapons sales. It enjoys important military benefits, including access to ports and listening posts, which allow its armed forces to monitor naval and other military activities around the Indian Ocean and the Andaman Sea. To feed its insatiable appetite for energy, it also seeks preferential deals for access to Burma's oil and gas reserves.

Beijing's engagement with the SPDC has been essential to the regime's survival. China has provided it with moral and financial support -- including funds and materiel to pay off Burmese military elites -- thus increasing its leverage at home and abroad. By throwing China's weight behind the SPDC, Beijing has complicated the strategic calculations of those of Burma's neighbors that are concerned about the direction the country is moving in, thus enabling the junta to pursue a classic divide-and-conquer approach.
⑥Like China, India is hungry for natural gas and other resources and is eager to build a road network through Burma that would expand its trade with ASEAN. As a result, it has attempted to match China step for step as an economic and military partner of the SPDC, providing tanks, light artillery, reconnaissance and patrol aircraft, and small arms; India is now Burma's fourth-largest trading partner. Singh's government has also fallen for the junta's blackmail over cross-border drug and arms trafficking and has preferred to give it military and economic assistance rather than let Burma become a safe haven for insurgents active in India's troubled northeastern region.
⑦Yet this shortsighted policy is clearly not in India's interests. Persistent repression and turmoil in Burma will continue to threaten India's security along its border. Internal political reform leading to a more open and reconciled Burma would be far more beneficial for India than anything that would result from India's current tactical accommodations. Of course, India is eager to counter Chinese influence and strengthen its linkages to ASEAN through Burma.
⑧Sanctions policies will need to coexist with various forms of engagement, and it will be necessary to coordinate all of these measures toward the common end of encouraging reform, reconciliation, and ultimately the return of democracy. To succeed, the region's major players will need to work together.
⑨The international community needs to act now to begin a process of concentrated and coordinated engagement for the benefit of the Burmese people and of broader peace and stability in Asia. As with the six-party talks on North Korea, a multilateral approach will require some compromise by all participants. The United States will need to reconsider its restrictions on engaging the SPDC; ASEAN, China, and India will need to reevaluate their historical commitment to noninterference; Japan will need to consider whether its economics-based approach to Burma undermines its new commitment to values-based diplomacy. But all parties have good reasons to make concessions. None of them can afford to watch Burma descend further into isolation and desperation and wait to act until another generation of its people is lost. In addition to humanitarian principles, there are strategic grounds for stepping up diplomatic efforts on Burma: it is now the most serious remaining challenge to the security and unity of Southeast Asia. Of course, change will eventually come to Burma. But without the coordinated engagement of the major interested powers today, that change will come at a great cost: to the stability of Southeast Asia, to the conscience of the international community, and, most important, to the long-suffering Burmese people, who languish in the shadows as the rest of the world concentrates its energies elsewhere.

 長いので所々(水平線部分)省略して抜粋しています。では、以下めちゃくちゃ簡単な意訳です。

 概略:ビルマが近隣諸国の安全保障の重大な脅威になっているため、国際社会は軍事政権に対する従来のアプローチを変更しなければならない。
 ①欧米は経済制裁で、アジア諸国は関与政策で対処してきたが、どちらも上手くいかなかった。そして、それにも関わらず、その方針を続けようとしている。
 ②欧米の情報当局は、政権が北朝鮮モデルを真似、弾道ミサイルと核兵器によって軍事的に経済的自立を達成することに関心があると疑っている。実際、北朝鮮との国交正常化と通常兵器貿易、原子力の平和利用に関するロシアとの協定などを行っており、国際社会はビルマの行動に関心を向けなければならない。
 ③対ビルマ政策において最も重要な要素になるのはASEANかもしれない。構成国は最近ビルマを外交的資源、そしてアジアの平和と安定の脅威と認識するようになった。
 ④ASEANは内政不干渉を旨としてきたが、普遍的価値としての民主主義と人権のために、国家平和発展評議会(ビルマ軍事政権の最高決定機関)の強い反対を押し切って人権委員会を設立した。東南アジア諸国のリーダシップは、軍事政権に対する新しい国際的なアプローチにおける不可欠な要素にもなるだろう。
 日本も改革のための重要な力になるだろう。東京とワシントンは80年代から90年代にかけて、ビルマに対する政策で意見の相違があったが、経済力の低下と中国の台頭により、最近日本の態度に有望なシフトがあった。「自由と繁栄の弧」構想にはビルマについての言及はなかったが、日本の対ビルマ政策に変化が起きたのは明らかだ。
 ビルマの人々が、英国の統治からの解放のために援助してくれた日本に対して、肯定的な記憶を持っているということからも日本の協力は特に重要となる。ビルマは日本が民主主義、人権擁護、地域安全保障の促進においてその誠実さを証明するいい機会になる。 
 ⑤ASEANと日本がビルマにアプローチする際、中国とインドは最大の障害になるかもしれない。中国はビルマに大きな関心を持っており、多額の兵器売買を通じて政治的、経済的に強い関係を持ってきた。また、インド洋とアンダマン海周辺での他国の軍を監視するための港へのアクセス権を含む、軍事的に重要な利益を持っている。さらに、ビルマの石油と天然ガスへのアクセスの優先権も狙っている。
 中国はビルマに財政援助を行っており、ビルマの軍事政権の維持には中国との関係が不可欠である。
 ⑥中国と同様にインドも天然ガスやその他の資源に飢え、ASEANとの貿易を拡大させるためにビルマを経由するロードネットワークを築きたいと切望している。その結果、国家平和発展評議会と経済的、軍事的パートナーとなって中国に対抗した。
 ⑦このインドの近視眼的な政策はインドの国益にならず、国境沿いの安全保障を脅かすだけである。ビルマがより開けている方がインドにとって有益なのは明らかである。インドは中国に対抗し、ビルマを通ってASEANとの結び付きを強化することを切望している。
 ⑧制裁措置は様々な形式の関与と一緒に行うこと必要があり、改革、和解、民主主義の奨励という共通の目的のためにこれらの手段の調整をしなければならない。成功するには地域が団結する必要がある。
 ⑨国際社会はビルマの人々と、アジアのより広い平和と安定のために、調整された関与政策を開始する必要がある。北朝鮮での6カ国協議のように、多数国参加のアプローチには参加者全員の何らかの妥協を必要とするだろう。米国は国家平和発展評議会との関与に対する制限を再考する必要があるだろう。ASEAN、中国、インドは歴史的な不干渉を再評価する必要があるだろう。 日本はビルマへの経済重視のアプローチが価値観外交をだめにしないか考える必要があるだろう。いずれにせよ、全ての参加国には譲歩するに足る理由がある。人道主義に加えて、外交努力を促進する戦略的根拠は、現在ビルマが東南アジアの安全保障と結束において最も重大な課題だからである。主要な関係国の連携がなければ、多大なつけを払うことになるだろう。

 ご覧の通りテキトーな訳なので気になる人は元記事をチェックしてみてください。それにしても、今まで全然気にしてきませんでしたが、こうして見ると、ビルマって地政学的にかなり重要な国ですね(←気付くの遅い)。是非ともアジアの安定のために「自由と繁栄の弧(自由民主主義陣営)」に取り込まないといけませんね。

 翻訳では特に“engagement”にてこずったのですが、「関与(政策)」でよかったのでしょうか?自然な日本語訳にならずに苦労しました。



 明日から後期が始まるので、ブログは更新頻度が少なくなったり、(元々しょぼいのにさらに)クオリティが下がったりすると思われます。あぁ就活どうしよう・・・鬱ですorz
[ 2007/09/30 22:19 ] 日本の安全保障 | TB(0) | CM(6)

マレー半島といえば、「クラ運河」なる構想が昔からありますね。マレー半島のくびれ、クラ地峡を掘ってしまえ、というあれです。
ビルマ、タイ、ヴェトナムといった国々の地政学的重要性を飛躍的に高める妄想プランでしたが、数年前に中国が建設に興味を示していたような記憶が。石油パイプラインを通す計画は現在進行形だった気がします。
[ 2007/09/30 23:33 ] [ 編集 ]

めちゃ面白い計画ですね。軽くググってみましたが、流石抜き目のない中国は積極的で、日本も多少関わってるみたい。ってか、よくそんな話まで知ってますね。本当に高校生ですか?(笑)自分の無知さが恥ずかしいorz
[ 2007/09/30 23:52 ] [ 編集 ]

こんにちは。コメントとTBありがとうございます。

中国とミャンマー軍事政権の関係は最近もワシントンポストで指摘されていますが、中国はかつてポルポトを支持した過去があったりなど、中国に対する国際社会の不信感はどうしてもありますね。

「engagement」は確かに日本語に訳すのが厄介な単語です。意味としては「婚約」や「戦闘」に使われたりなど、文脈によって意味が全く違ってしまうので、つまり「取り決めによる活発な関係」というニュアンスなので、適宜日本語の単語を選ぶ必要があります。

私も翻訳は時間を節約するために機械翻訳は活用しています。ただ結局殆ど書き直す事になるので結果的には参考程度です。英和ならGoogleやInfoseekもありますが、結局エキサイトが一番まともに訳してくれますね。
[ 2007/10/01 10:16 ] [ 編集 ]

こんにちは。

中国はテロ(支援)国家です(笑)

「meeting engagement(遭遇戦)」「Rules Of Engagement(交戦規定)」あるいは「engagement」単体の場合も「婚約」や「戦闘」なら比較的訳しやすいのですが、今回みたいのは難しいです><

やっぱりエキサイトが一番マシですよね。エキサイト以外だと意味不明だけど、エキサイトはなんとか大意はつかめますから。それで面白そうだったら自分で訳す、という感じでやってます。
[ 2007/10/01 21:12 ] [ 編集 ]

はじめまして^^

こんばんは。

少しばかり、お節介を。

「engagemant」は、国際関係論(国際政治)では、もう、ほぼ、日本語にはしません。エンゲージメントと使います。コンテクストから見て、軍事用語ではないですから、日本語にするなら、「積極的関与」となります。

少し、古い本だと、「取り込み」とされているものもあります。

ただ、日本語にするなら「積極的関与」がいいですね。

意味は、関与は、コミットメントですが、これよりも、より、強い様々な分野での、働きかけ、関係強化になります。そのようにして、結果、対象アクターを依存させ、身動きがとれないように、こちらの、政策によって、大きく、依存国の政策を制約していくぐらいの意味ですね。依存国の敏感性と脆弱性を高める戦略です。

[ 2007/10/03 01:54 ] [ 編集 ]

こんばんは

確かに「engagemant」はカタカナで見かけますね
できるだけ訳はカタカナ使わない方がいいかなと思って無理に訳しましたが、例えば「power」も力・権力と訳すよりそのままパワーって使いますしね

意味の解説もありがとうございました
[ 2007/10/03 21:21 ] [ 編集 ]

コメントの投稿














管理者にだけ表示を許可する

トラックバック

この記事のトラックバックURL
http://wolf66.blog106.fc2.com/tb.php/35-8ff72af5







上記広告は1ヶ月以上更新のないブログに表示されています。新しい記事を書くことで広告を消せます。